“Suspect Device” by Chris Suspect {Second Edition}!

“Suspect Device” by Chris Suspect {Second Edition}!

Books, Spotlight
Cover to "Suspect Device"
Cover to “Suspect Device”

2015 is starting off with a bang for us here at Empty Stretch. We are happy to announce the second edition of one of our biggest publications from last year, “Suspect Device” by Chris Suspect. Suspect grew up going to the type of shows that left you in a daze, and while you may have sworn you’d never go back, the following Friday night you’d find yourself back at it again. Fast forward twenty-five years, Suspect set out to rediscover these shows, and created a body of work spanning over the past four years of the Washington, D.C. and Baltimore area punk scene. The images are as fast and spontaneous as the music, yet more importantly, Suspect captures the camaraderie and kinship behind the music. Showcased for the first time in book form, “Suspect Device” provides a look into a scene that hasn’t thought of stopping or slowing down since it started.

We’re also thrilled to announce that this series will featured at the D.C. Leica Store Gallery starting in March, with Chris even doing a few workshops through the duration of the show. We’ll update with information as more comes together, but it’s awesome seeing this work getting the attention it deserves. 

Spread from "Suspect Device"
Spread from “Suspect Device”

BOOK INFO:
“Suspect Device”
By Chris Suspect
68 pages, 8.5 x 11 in
Second Edition of 250
Forward by Alec MacKaye
$20 USD + S/H
Pre-order / Purchase (All orders will start shipping March 10, 2015)

Check out some of the hype and press about Chris and the series, “Suspect Device” below!
Leica Camera Blog
Washington City Paper

William Douglas on Joel Meyerowitz

William Douglas on Joel Meyerowitz

Feature, Petty Thieves, Spotlight

We have a new series we are excited to announce “Artist on Artist” and first up is Petty Thieves Alum William Douglas writes about the influence of Joel Meyerowtiz’s work on his own.

William Douglas fts The Same Difference Between Us and Them William Douglas fts The Same Difference Between Us and ThemWhen I first started making pictures, many photographers who used cameras to capture “the decisive moment” intrigued me. However, growing up in quieter coastal environments I often did not find creating these types of images to be truthful to my situation. The first photographer I related to artistically was Joel Meyerowitz. I found a copy of his book Cape Light in a thrift store while on a camping trip to Hatteras Island. Being that I was living in an area that lies near multiple rivers, a bay, and an ocean, water was prominent in my artwork. At the time I found the book I was not actively searching for photographers; I was mostly taking pictures to use as reference for paintings I was creating in Chesapeake, Virginia. A majority of the artistic imagery I was exposed to up until this point, with the exception of pop culture influences, was local nautical art with no larger conceptual context.

Joel Meyerowitz Plate 8 Ballston Beach, Truro, 1976 William Douglas fts The Same Difference Between Us and Them

William Douglas fts The Same Difference Between Us and Them Joel Meyerowitz Plate 15 Provincetown,1976When I bought Cape Light it had been almost thirty years since its first print with The Museum of Fine Arts Boston. Knowing that a series can resurface and influence a different generation years later is still something that excites me when viewing classic photographs. I was intrigued by Meyerowitz’s use of toying with the cliché of beach imagery through large format photography, while presenting a type of intimacy someone can only gain by investing time within a tidal region. Through his photographs I learned methods of capturing an aura of a place. In the forward of the book Clifford S. Ackley refers to the twilight hours in which Meyerowitz would make his photographs, quoting the french phrase entire chien et loup (“between dog and wolf”). It was the use of light during these hours that heightened the narrative quality of his photographs, which enlightened me to the possibilities of what I could capture with a camera. As years have passed, I have found many more influences since I came across this series but I still look back to Cape Light and especially PLATE 29 TRURO, 1976 and PLATE 37 PROVINCETOWN, 1977 when seeking inspiration.

William Douglas fts The Same Difference Between Us and Them Joel Meyerowitz Plate 29 Truro, 1976

Please see more work from both William Douglas and Joel Meyerowtiz

Feature: Sophie Barbasch

Feature: Sophie Barbasch

Feature, Spotlight

Sophie Barbasch’s The Source of Heat triggers an intense gravitational energy that emanates from a particular manipulation of light and color. Images point to atmospheric landscapes, amorphous objects, and emotive figures that mediate an ambiguous spectrum of lightness and darkness.

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Defined as a noun, the word heat describes the sensation, perception, and quality of being hot- often regarded as a sensation relating to the body. As a verb, heat can be understood as an arousal of intense emotion – energy that excites the mind with rage or passion. The Source of Heat repeatedly places the viewer in a position to evaluate an emotional temperature as both action and entity, showing the source of emotion as a moving target.

Sophie Barbasch fts The Source of Heat
Please fine more of Sophie Barbasch’s photography on her website. 

Feature: Erich Brumback

Feature: Erich Brumback

Feature, Pictures, Spotlight

Today we bring you the photographic work of Erich Brumback, currently creative writing student living in Virginia.

“The majority of these photographs were taken on slide film. I tend to associate the higher saturation and more narrow exposure latitude of this kind of film with the emotional intensity and specificity of memory. Our experiences become memories only with distance. Something we saw or heard someone say will stick with us, and the rest falls away as we move further along from the event. I’ve always found quieter moments to be the ones that stick with me most easily, lulls in conversation or wandering to places that gave me some sense of peace. These photographs are intended to convey those kinds of moments and to offer the viewer some of the same reflection and clarity I get from them.”

Please fine more of Erich Brumback’s work on his website.

Feature: Brent Adkins

Feature: Brent Adkins

Feature, Spotlight

Brent Adkin’s recently sent some work our way, have a look.

“the mundane” is an ongoing series of photographs that capture the everyday moments that we tend to overlook or dismiss. They represent reality in a detached and analytical manner, shining a spotlight on an empty dining table or an “everything you could ever need” store, leaving the viewer to stop and consider what these things mean to us as individuals and as a society. When you step inside a person’s home, you see a reflection of who they are, and the same goes for communities of any kind, large or small. We express ourselves a lot more than we realize, often in ways we are unaware of.

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Please find more of Brent Adkin’s work on his website. 

 

Feature: Fabrizio Albertini

Feature: Fabrizio Albertini

Feature, Spotlight

Genius Loci Vol.1 is an autobiographic statement. It is a daily journey that was born as much from the will of maturing as a photographer as from the necessity of facing a long convalescence. Each snapshot is the destination of a travel at your fingertips, a trip that was almost always an Italian one, in which, with selective and precise criteria, I was looking for the presence of color, composition and light. Realized between the summers of 2012 and 2013,  Genius Loci Vol.1 walks the spectator through a few recurring paths: Milan, the water, the vegetation, the animals, the non-place, the Virgin Mary. They are all pacific environments, reassuring in a certain way, and in which I’ve always searched for order of things.

The location choice was rather accidental. Often I just happened to find a space that I liked and I waited and waited, until something, just about anything, would appear and complete it.

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fts Genius Loci Vol. 1

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fts Genius Loci Vol. 1

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Please find more of Albertini’s work on his website. 

Interview: Marcel Rollock

Interview: Marcel Rollock

Feature, Interview, Spotlight

We recently asked Marcel Rollock some questions about his work & his new zine, Serenity Now.

Empty Stretch: Age/ Location
Marcel Rollock: 24 / Brooklyn

ES: How did you get into photography?
MR: I started taking pictures when I was 17 or so while living in Australia. Our group of friends were always skating or going out drinking and doing stupid, random stuff and taking pictures of it all just seemed normal. A couple of few of us would bring cameras and I was one of them. Shooting on film was the cool thing so we would go around to goodwill stores or whatever and pick up cheap 35mm cameras.

ES: What were some early influences?
MR: Definitely being exposed to so many places growing up, my family, friends and music. The homie Lloyd Stubber was coming out with some rad stuff and really seeing his pictures and feeling a connection to them was cool. My girlfriend Shay Richardson would always be showing me her latest shots and rolls of film which kept me wanting to shoot more.

EmptyStretch_MarcellRollock_03

ES: What made you decide to do a zine?
MR: It had been something on my mind for about a year before starting it and I have always thought photographs are better in print. Looking though a zine gives you a whole different feel then just looking at pictures online.

ES:  What were decisions in sequencing/ editing/ layout?
MR:It terms of sequencing and layout I really just went with what felt right. Nobody knows your photos better than you and that being the case it was just a matter of putting photos in an order that complements them the best. All works were shot on film so the only editing done was for printing purposes for example dpi.

ES: Any newer zines recently that you’ve enjoyed?
MR: ‘The Last Best Place’ by Brian Merriam just made me want to move to Wyoming. ‘Division of Vision’ by Jay Dymock and Lloyd Stubber has those Aussie vibes and ‘Play’ by Pat O’Rourke is sick!

ES: Do you decide whats a photograph while shooting or during editing? Are you more documenting time of a scenario or composing an image?
MR: Shooting solely on film forces you to decide what a photograph is while taking the picture and that is what’s so appealing about it, you are telling a story in a way. In the past I have used digital cameras but never really liked the results.

Find more of Rollock’s work over on his website.

Feature: “-blue” by Brett Davis

Feature: “-blue” by Brett Davis

Feature, Pictures, Spotlight

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Petty Thieves alumni and good friend, Brett Davis, recently sent us a new body of work titled -blue.  Here’s what he had to say about it:

-blue is an ongoing street series which draws inspiration from the are, bure, boke style championed by Provoke photographers Yutaka Takanashi, Takuma Nakahira, and Daido Moriyama. It is the first series in a larger exploration of Japanese photography. The name, -blue, comes from the bright blue color of the cross processed negative.

We’re really liking the direction this series is headed and below is just a small edit of what Davis sent over. Please check out more of Davis’ work here, and stay tuned for information about his upcoming Empty Stretch publication, Dai Kinchö!

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Interview: Charalampos Kydonakis aka “dirty harrry”

Interview: Charalampos Kydonakis aka “dirty harrry”

Feature, Interview, Pictures, Spotlight

Charalampos Kydonakis aka "dirty harrry"
Over the past few years I have been following the moniker “dirty harrry” on Flickr, and have always been curious about just who this person was. That’s why I was thrilled when we got an email from Charalampos Kydonakis aka “dirty harrry” sharing his work with us. Check out the interview below and start following this photo machine immediately.

Empty Stretch: What’s your current location & favorite place to photograph?

Charalampos Kydonakis: I’m living in Rethymnon, Crete. I don’t know if it’s my favourite place to photograph, but my favourite photos have been shot here

Charalampos Kydonakis aka "dirty harrry"
ES: Your aesthetic crosses many styles, what is your background with photography and is there a certain subject matter you prefer shooting?

CK: I started photographing when I was a student of architecture, so the first ten years I was shooting only architectural stuff. After I saw some masters’ work I focused more on people. Now I don’t have a certain preference, every subject seems challenging to me.

Charalampos Kydonakis aka "dirty harrry"
ES: Your photographs seem to allude to a painterly style, is this an influence to your work? What are some of your biggest photography and non-photography influences?

CK: There were many lessons of history of architecture and history of art in my university faculty. All these lessons helped me to understand something about how a thought can be expressed and formed visually in 2 or 3 dimensions. I don’t know if history of architecture and art has influenced my photos , I guess not, maybe subconsciously, but not by intention. I started to view photos of great photographers about 6 years before, when I started to photograph people. Some genius minds that I pray under their visions are:

  • Directors: Sam Peckinpah, Akira Kurosawa, Luis Buñuel.
  • Writers: Nikos Kazantzakis
  • Painting: El Greco, Francisco de Goya, Max Ernst , Paul Klee.
  • Architecture: Frank Lloyd Wright, Vladimir Tatlin.
  • Music: Ástor Piazzolla, Ennio Morricone, Vicente Amigo, Stelios Foustalieris.

I ‘m inspired a lot by my people, other times by strangers, unimportant things, and other times, I’ve just drunk much and I shoot whatever is in front of me.

ES: What is the source of dirty harrry?

CK: harrry : a shortcut of my first name (Charalampos) in greek. dirty : my photos. My nickname doesn’t refer to the Callahan cop, I prefer Clint Eastwood in his western films rather than the Cop role, I don’t like cops.

Charalampos Kydonakis aka "dirty harrry"

ES: You group your images with interesting titles, what is your process for sequencing, are they shot at the same time or do you group them later?

CK: Initially, some years before, I didn’t have any project in mind, I just  took the camera and went out to shoot. After some years, I started to gather photos from specific subjects, I realized I had to somehow to group my photos so that I could see what it was that I was trying to shoot, and then focus on it. Still after all this grouping I don’t know what I’m shooting exactly. The projects change, a lot of old stuff is deleted and new photos get in the existing sets; sets get deleted and new ones emerge. Sequencing is a never-ending process.

Charalampos Kydonakis aka "dirty harrry"
ES: How many projects do you have going on in your head at one time?

CK: Most times I’m confused and there are many thoughts spinning around my head. I have in the background of my mind these existing projects and there are times I see things that could fit somewhere. Other times, I go out trying to shoot something specific to develop an idea. Many times though I simply have an enormous vacuum in my mind and shoot without thinking.

ES: What is photography for you on a daily basis?

CK: Probably two things:

  • Shooting my own stuff and editing them some weeks afterwards.
  • Looking at other people’s work and editing my blog with work that I find inspiring.

ES: If could have dinner with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

CK: I wouldn’t like to have to dinner, cause we would eat and we wouldn’t talk much. But I’d like to get drunk one night with Nikos Kazantzakis or Sam Peckinpah or any of the people I love and are away from me.

Please check out more of Kydonakis’ work on his website and flickr.

Review: “Somewhere Else” by Stephanie Noritz

Review: “Somewhere Else” by Stephanie Noritz

Books, Feature, Pictures, Spotlight

Always moving, never stopping. Words I hope to soon live and breathe by but for the time being, I’ve been living vicariously through works that speak to this notion. Stephanie Noritz’s self-published photobook “Somewhere Else” was the trip I didn’t know I was looking for. With simple yet elegant photographs, mixed with smart pacing, and book design,  Noritz presents a self-published gem to help you get through that daily grind until you too can hit the open road.

Stephanie Noritz "Somewhere Else"

The book is heavily landscaped based, and while people do make a regular appearance, the scenery and singular compositions are what move this trip along. Each scene looking similar to the next, yet different enough to keep the viewer engaged, help fit the name of the book, “Somewhere Else.” The place ultimately matters little in this trip, as the importance of being “here” is outweighed by the importance of being “there.” This universality of the images also pushes the viewer for repeat visits, and encourages the idea of not necessarily starting from the traditional beginning of the book, but rather forming their own journey through the work.

Stephanie Noritz "Somewhere Else"

Stephanie Noritz "Somewhere Else"

This photobook is a good example of how things can come together when you allow for the images and design to speak for themselves. Instead of relying on bells and whistles to gain the attention of the viewer, small things like attention to printing, sequencing, and holding back from giving too much information to the viewer, made this book. This isn’t your great aunt’s vacation photos, and they may even be unlike any trip you’ve taken before, but you’ll be hard pressed not to find something that catches your attention and keeps bringing you back to this book.

Stephanie Noritz "Somewhere Else"

Please check out more of Stephanie Noritz’s work here and be sure to pick up a copy of  “Somewhere Else” here, before they’re gone.